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Asia After Dark in 3D

3-D scan image of Buddha probably Vairochana (Piluzhena) with the Realms of Existence and other Buddhist scenes.

3D scan image of the Cosmic Buddha with the Realms of Existence and other Buddhist scenes.

Allison Tyra is an intern in the F|S Public Affairs and Marketing Department.

On Saturday, Asia After Dark welcomes a special guest. He has no hands, and no head, but the Cosmic Buddha has plenty to tell us. This desktop version of a stone sculpture on view in the exhibition Promise of Paradise: Early Chinese Buddhist Sculpture was made using a 3D printer. The incredibly detailed depictions on the deity’s robe tell stories of the Buddhist Realms of Existence, from the heavenly devas to the hells of the less fortunate—fascinating to small children and PhD-wielding scholars alike.

Just as fascinating are the technological advances that allow engineers such as Vince Rossi, 3D Digitization Coordinator at the Smithsonian, to create exact replicas of ancient artifacts out of paper and other materials. Rossi can make small, lightweight versions or large, sturdy copies that could be easier to examine with incredible precision.

“Our focus is on 3D scanning of collection objects and archaeological sites, not just 3D printing replicas,” Rossi says. “With the 3D data itself, we are able to do many things that we cannot do with the real object or 3D printed replica—providing new analysis tools for research, for example. Since 3D scanning is nothing more than millions of measurement points describing an object’s surface, we can offer a researcher many more ways to virtually investigate an object. For example, a conservator can look at two 3D scans of an object taken from one year to the next to see exactly how the object is changing over time.”

Once all of the original item’s data has been uploaded, people around the world can view these details, as well as use a 3D printer to produce their own versions of the object. In other words, a schoolteacher in Oklahoma or a researcher in Shanghai can use the Smithsonian’s information to create interactive tools for learning at all levels.

See how it works and talk with Rossi in person on Saturday, August 17, 7–11 pm, by attending Asia After Dark: Chinese Martial Arts at the Freer. Other highlights of the evening will include the DJs of Hop Fu providing a live score to classic kung fu films, tai chi in the galleries, a DIY crafty teacup sleeve art activity, Tsingtao Chinese beer, kung fu martial performances, and more. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door; Silk Road Society members pay $15 in advance and $20 at the door. The ticket price includes one free drink. Guests must be 21 years old with valid photo ID to attend.

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Drawing After Dark

Action Drawing HERO performing in the courtyard of the freer Gallery.

Action Drawing HERO performing in the courtyard of the Freer Gallery (photo by Cory Grace).

Natalie Creamer is an intern in the office of development at Freer|Sackler.

Korean art-performance group Action Drawing HERO fascinated an enthusiastic crowd at last week’s Asia After Dark: Korea Seoul Train. Combining drawing with synchronized dance and mime, the troupe captured elements of contemporary and traditional Korean art to create a tiger out of charcoal and a portrait of South Korean musician Psy in vibrant watercolor.

Prior to the performance, I had the opportunity to sit down with the four members of Action Drawing HERO—who call themselves the Jackson team, after Michael Jackson’s iconic moves—and a translator from the Korean Cultural Center. None of the Jackson team has ever attended art school. As a result, the group adheres to a strict rehearsal schedule that can sometimes last from 10 am to 10 pm.

The members of Action Drawing HERO have performed together for five years, mostly at private theaters in Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, and China. They utilize innovative art techniques such as light scratching, dust drawing, and cube art, which was showcased at the Freer. Occasionally, they also incorporate modern technologies such as video projections.

I asked the actors what they liked most about being on stage. They replied, “We love to show audiences how art can be created in new and entertaining ways.” The group’s live art performances have helped it cultivate a successful international following, including an extensive Facebook fan base. After their success at Korea Seoul Train, we hope they’ll come back for more!

Can’t get enough Asia After Dark? Get ready for Chinese Martial Arts on Saturday, August 17. Details will be posted to our website soon.

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DJ Spooky at Asia After Dark

A portrait of Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, at Asia After Dark.

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Getting the Party Started

Drinks by Ping Pong

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Drum Kit

Making a renewable frame drum as part of Asia After Dark.

Instrument maker John Tewksbury showed participants how to make and personalize a renewable-frame drum. All it takes is wood, plastic wrap, paint and decorations, and your own imagination!

A drummer with heart.

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Asia After Dark: Night at the Museum

Guests arrive for Asia After Dark and check out the list of the evening’s events.

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Asia After Dark Begins at 7pm tonight!

DJ Spooky and musicians Danielle Cho and Jennifer Kim

Asia After Dark: Asian Soundscape begins in about an hour and includes a live performance by acclaimed digital media artist and musician DJ Spooky and instrumentalists Danielle Cho and Jennifer Kim. Also on the program, instrument-maker John Tewksbury and cross-cultural percussionist Steve Bloom, follow by curator-led exhibition tours. Listen. Watch. Create….then dance!

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Remixing the Museum: An Interview with DJ Spooky

DJ Spooky, Novara Jazz Festival 2007; credit: Giancarlo Minelli

In anticipation of Asia After Dark: Asian Soundscape, Bento caught up with acclaimed digital media artist and musician Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky. He will perform at F|S on Friday evening, playing music set against 1940s black-and-white films featuring Asian American pioneer actress Anna May Wong.

Bento: As the first DJ in residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, can you tell me what it’s like to score for a museum, a place that’s known primarily for visual arts?

DJSpooky: Everybody likes to think of museums as places of “permanence”—but it couldn’t be further from reality. Shows change all the time; collections come and go. I like to think the performance I’m doing at the Sackler is essentially about the constantly changing landscape of digital media. It’s also a musical homage to how people perceived one of the principal figures of the beginning of the last century. It’s always cool to play with history. Anna May Wong is super cool!

B: As an artist and musician, what inspires your creativity?

DJS: Fun! Everything serious should be seriously fun!

B: Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming performance here and why you chose to rescore the Lady from Chungking, starring Anna May Wong?

DJS: If you’ve seen Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, if you’ve seen Roman Polanski’s Chinatown, you get the vibe—mysterious, Oriental exotic; yeah! Gangnam style, from the 1920s! That’s why I thought Lady from Chungking would be a cool film to present as a dance party film. Mystery + history … keep it movin’!

Anna May Wong, photographed by Carl Van Vechten; via Wikimedia Commons

B: When did you first become interested in Asian cinema?

DJS: Everybody from Wu-Tang Clan on over to Hendrix’s incredible album covers based on Indian mythology, to even more pop-influenced material like David Bowie’s China Girl: That’s all stuff in my record collection. When I was growing up listening to mix tapes, everyone put clips from Chinese and Japanese films on their mixes. It just made everything sound cool. The dynamics of Kurosawa, the intensity of Bruce Lee, the surrealness of Beat Takeshi, and of course, the wildness of Takashi Miike … plus Lucy Liu … that’s the vibe. I guess I was like an American kid of the last 40 years, immersed in the subtle influences of both pop cinema and arthouse material.

B: As a native Washingtonian, was the Smithsonian an important part of your childhood?

DJS: The Smithsonian museum system was always a portal into a different world, where you could easily drift into the way that they reflected so much history, and so much of the way the world’s complexity is part of the American experience. As a kid, I could imagine them as worlds unto themselves. You could get lost and wander in them for hours, if not entire days. That was the beauty of growing up in DC—you had the entire world at your figertips. It’s experiences like going to Antarctica to write a string ensemble work that made me realize how much the museums of DC gave me the ability to think of the immense horizons DC kids have access to. It’s a great situation.

B: Can you tell us what’s next for DJ Spooky?

DJS: After I do my show at the Sackler, I have concerts in Korea and China mid-October. I’m also finishing my next book with MIT, about apps. It’s called The Imaginary App.

Get your Asia After Dark tickets here.

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Asia After Dark: Afro-Asiatic Mash-up

A mash-up of Asia After Dark; photos by Cory Grace, Hutomo Wicaksono, and Susan DiMarino

Amanda Williams is a public affairs specialist at Freer|Sackler, and the producer and creative force behind Asia After Dark.

This past Saturday, Freer|Sackler kicked off its wildly popular Asia After Dark event series with a garden party featuring a mash-up performance of Japanese vogue dance, theater, storytelling, and hip-hop music choreographed by visual artist iona rozeal brown and performed by soloist dancer Monstah Black. Guests also created masks using Asian botanical symbols and Ashanti adinkra symbols from West Africa, enjoyed curator-led tours of Hokusai and Perspectives: Ai Weiwei, Afro-disiac cocktails and Sake YUM-YUM shots, a special Chuck Brown tribute, and lots of photo booth fun. The event was attended by more than 1,000 cultural revelers taking in all the excitement the evening had to offer, along with the perfect spring weather and almost full moon.

Asia After Dark: Asian Soundcape returns on Friday, September 28, 7-11 pm, featuring a film soundtrack homage by acclaimed digital media artist and musician Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, and instrumentalists Danielle Cho and Jennifer Kim, set against an early silent film featuring Asian American pioneer actress Anna May Wong. Tickets on sale now at: www.asia.si.edu/asiaafterdark.

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